Punctuality, Part 1 (The Man in the Mirror #53)


In keeping with our theme of dealing with the man (or woman) in the mirror, we are going to continue discussing the building of important biblical character traits in your life. Today, we will begin looking at the quality of Punctuality from “The Power for True Success” by the Institute in Basic Life Principles.

Punctuality is demonstrating the worth of people and time by arriving for appointments before they begin.

Punctuality is based on two important factors. The first is a reverence for time, and the second is a respect for other people.

Punctuality is being present, prepared, and alert for appointed times and seasons. Being punctual is living in harmony with the nature of God (Who is always precisely on time). Failing to be punctual hinders God’s purposes in our lives and offends those who are then forced to wait for us. People tend to count the faults of those who keep them waiting. The longer they wait, the more faults they find.

Be Confident (The Brother’s Keeper #61)


Dear Y.B.M.,

In this world, it is easy to feel as though you are inferior. It is easy to go through life with a lack of confidence weighing you down. It is easy to think that other people are better and that they have it all together.

However, God wants you to be confident. When I talk about confidence, I am not talking about being cocky. I am not talking about being proud. I am not even talking about self-esteem, which our society loves to talk about instilling in young people today. Rather, I am talking about knowing who you are in God.

And who are you?

You are a child of God, made in His image. That alone should give you confidence. But, beyond that, if you have received Jesus Christ into your heart as your Savior, you have also been forgiven of all of your sins and you no longer stand before God in a state of condemnation, but in a state of righteousness. Thus, your flaws and your failures no longer have to hold you down.

The Biblical terms for confidence carry the meaning of putting one’s trust or faith in something or someone else. Some people put their trust in money, human knowledge, physical strength, or other people. But, a truly confident person puts his trust in God. Notice how Jeremiah describes this individual: “Blessed is the man that trusteth in the Lord, and whose hope the Lord is. For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and that spreadeth out her roots by the river, and shall not see when heat cometh, but her leaf shall be green; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit.“

When your confidence is rooted in trust in God, you do not have to fear people, circumstances, or the devil. Second Timothy 1:7 states, “God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.” Your confidence or lack thereof is a matter of what is going on in your mind. If you have the sound mind that comes from a relationship with God, when things get out of hand around you, you can remain even-keeled. In every situation, you can say with the writer of Hebrews: “We boldly say, The Lord is my helper, I will not fear what man shall do unto me.”

If your trust and faith is in God, you have no reason to be afraid in this life. You have no reason to think less of yourself. You have no reason to feel as though you cannot do great things with your life. You can.

Be confident,

Daniel Whyte III

P.T. (Power Thoughts):

Jon Walker said, “Our confidence is not in our ability but in God’s ability.”

Stephen Curry said, “I’ve always believed that success for anyone is all about drive, dedication, and desire; but for me, it’s also been about confidence and faith.”

Jack Canfield said, “People who ask confidently get more than those who are hesitant and uncertain. When you’ve figured out what you want to ask for, do it with certainty, boldness and confidence. Don’t be shy or feel intimidated by the experience. You may face some unexpected criticism, but be prepared for it with confidence.”

Martin Luther said, “Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times.”

Marcus Garvey said, “With confidence, you have won before you have started.”

Sensitivity, Part 2 (The Man in the Mirror #52)


In keeping with our theme of dealing with the man (or woman) in the mirror, we are going to continue discussing the building of important biblical character traits in your life. Today, we will continue looking at the quality of Sensitivity from “The Power for True Success” by the Institute in Basic Life Principles.

Josiah was only eight years old when he became King of Judah. The biography that God wrote of his life concludes with an amazing tribute: “And like unto him was there no king before him, that turned to the LORD with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his might, according to all the law of Moses; neither after him arose there any like him.”

According to the record, the key to his greatness was his tender heart. The account also explains how he developed it.

1. He purposed to please God.

God’s summary of the life and ministry of Josiah is this: “He did that which was right in the sight of the LORD.” As a boy, Josiah set his heart to follow the Lord in the same way that Daniel purposed in his heart that he would not defile himself by participating in heathen customs.

2. He chose a Godly role model.

It would have been easy for Josiah to follow the evil ways of his father and grandfather. Instead, he chose to walk “in all the ways of David his father.” King Josiah used David’s life as a pattern for righteous living, because David was known as a man after God’s own heart.

Be Honest (The Brother’s Keeper #60)


Dear Y.B.M.,

One of the first marks of a young man who has good character is honesty. Because there are so many people who will be dishonest to keep a job, to get money, or to get out of a bad situation, the world wants, and desperately needs, honest men who will stand up for truth in every situation.

It is evident that God hates the sin of dishonesty by the number of times He warns against it in His Holy Word. Here are a few verses from the Bible that refer to the sin of lying:

Exodus 20:16 says, “Thou shalt not bear false witness…”

Proverbs 19:9 says, “A false witness shall not be unpunished, and he that speaketh lies shall perish.”

Romans 13:13 says, “Let us walk honestly.”

2 Corinthians 8:21 says, “Providing for honest things, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men.”

There is no instance in which lying will help you better than telling the truth. I have learned by experience that people will respect you more and get along with you better if you tell them the truth — even if you think it will make you look bad in their sight. Some people who are worried about others’ opinions of them build a house of lies around themselves — they lie about their past, they lie about who they are, they lie about what they have done. The problem is that once someone finds out that you lied to them about one thing, you give them reason to question whether you have lied to them about other things. In every situation, it is best to be upfront and honest.

No matter what you do, or what anybody else does, do not lie. Do not be afraid to tell the truth on yourself or on anybody else. Live a life of transparency and authenticity. Don’t try to appear as someone that you are not.

In the end, the truth always wins.

Daniel Whyte III

P.T. (Power Thoughts):

Thomas Jefferson said, “Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.”

Zig Ziglar said, “The foundation stones for balanced success are honesty, character, integrity, faith, love and loyalty.”

William Shakespeare said, “No legacy is so rich as honesty.”

Virginia Woolf said, “If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people.”

Albert Einstein said, “Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.”

Sensitivity, Part 1 (The Man in the Mirror #51)


This podcast is directed to all young people, but primarily to young black men, young black women, and their parents. We are thankful for all the people who are standing up for justice and racial equality. But this podcast is about the man in the mirror. What are you doing for the glory of God, to make life better for others, for your family, and for yourself?

In keeping with our theme of dealing with the man (or woman) in the mirror, we are going to continue discussing the building of important biblical character traits in your life. Today, we will continue looking at the quality of Sensitivity from “The Power for True Success” by the Institute in Basic Life Principles.

Sensitivity is being aware of the pain in others because of the healing we have received from God for similar hurts.

Sensitivity is perceiving the true feelings of others and appropriately adapting our responses to them.

The Biblical word for sensitive is tenderhearted. Scripture instructs us: “Be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” The Greek word for tenderhearted comes from two words, the first meaning “good” or “well” and the second meaning “spleen” or “intestine.” Figuratively, it means “pity or sympathy, the source of inward affections such as kindness and compassion.”