Be Passionate (The Brother’s Keeper #62)


Daniel Whyte III

Daniel Whyte III

Dear Y.B.M.,

One of the saddest things that I see in the world today is people who have no passion in life. They meander through their existence being acted upon by others. They have no vigor and no vision of their own. If you ask them where they would like to be ten years from now, they would have no idea.

Don’t be this kind of person.

The most successful people in life are passionate about what they do. Passion is defined as: “strong and barely controllable emotion; an intense desire or enthusiasm for something.” Is there something that excites you? Something that gets you out of bed in the morning? If it is not your work, is there something that you look forward to at the end of the day or the end of the week? What do you live for?

Interestingly, the trial, torture, crucifixion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ is referred to as His “Passion.” Standing before Pilate, Jesus said, “To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world.” Yes, Jesus’ Passion involved His own suffering, but that did not deter Him from His purpose.

Have you figured out why you are in the world? Do you know the purpose for which you were born? Until you find this passion for living, you will be like the proverbial fish lying on the grass. No matter how much you try to adjust and adapt to the grass, you will grow weaker and weaker. You will eventually die, a life wasted. Only when the fish is in the water does he thrive.

When trying to find your passion, don’t follow money, don’t follow success, don’t follow others. First, ask God to show you what He wants you to do with your life. You will find that He has uniquely gifted you with the ability to do His will for you. God told Jeremiah, “Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; and before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee, and I ordained thee a prophet unto the nations.”

Then, listen to your heart. Most of us never do this. We sacrifice our true desires in order to fit in with others, to be accepted, or to follow a path set for us by our parents, by our desire for money, or by our desire for ease and worldly success. But, such a life always ends in dissatisfaction. Only when you follow your passion and God’s passion for you will you live a life of fulfillment and peace of mind and heart. Nothing is more satisfying than that.

Be passionate,

Daniel Whyte III

P.T. (Power Thoughts):

Mark Twain said, “The two most important days in your life are the day you were born, and the day you find out why.”

Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable. Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.”

Elon Musk said, “People should pursue what they’re passionate about. That will make them happier than pretty much anything else.”

John Wesley said, “When you set yourself on fire, people love to come and see you burn.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “Enthusiasm is one of the most powerful engines of success. When you do a thing, do it with all your might. Put your whole soul into it. Stamp it with your own personality. Be active, be energetic and faithful, and you will accomplish your object. Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.”


Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in over twenty-five foreign countries. He is the author of over forty books including the Essence Magazine, Dallas Morning News, and Amazon.com national bestseller, Letters to Young Black Men. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry.

He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts/podcasts, which include: The Prayer Motivator Devotional, The Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report, the Second Coming Watch Update and the Soul-Winning Motivator, among others.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, a Master’s degree in Religion, a Master of Divinity degree, and a Master of Theology degree from Liberty University’s Rawlings School of Divinity (formerly Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary). He is currently a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry degree.

He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica since 1987. God has blessed their union with seven children.

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You Are Not Inferior! (Letter 15)

Dear Y.B.M.:

I am back in Atlanta, and at the writing of this letter, I am on the beautiful campus of Morehouse College — the alma mater of the late and great Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Down through the years, I have noticed that one of the marks of a “Morehouse man” is confidence. And that is what I want to write to you about today.

I hope that you are not one of the many young men in our community who feels inferior and shows that he feels inferior to other races — particularly the white race. It is disturbing to see so many young black men catch this disease called an inferiority complex when it comes to other races. It is almost as though this disease is in the air in the black community.

What are some of the ways that we catch this awful disease? Well, one way to get this disease is by not being raised right. Often times, if a parent does not know how to love and nurture a child while he is young, especially black boys, that child will grow up out of balance mentally, therefore feeling inferior. I am one of those who believe that young black children need lots of love, nurturing, and encouragement to turn out right in this strange society that we live in, especially black boys. It is crucial.

I believe the second reason why young black men feel inferior to others is because they have become addicted to that one eyed monster – the television set. I am convinced through my own observation of children that those children who grow up with a heavy diet of television watching will often times end up with feelings of inferiority. This happens simply because they are constantly watching others on the tube doing things and who are progressing and moving forward with their lives while they just watch. Of course, most of the people we see on television are white, and certainly most of the people we see in positive roles on television are white. This constant bombardment on our young black boys is destructive. One of the reasons why I don’t let my children watch television is because I don’t want them to think that white people are the standard of beauty and I don’t want them to think that white is always right.

In consequence of this heavy dose of television watching, they never develop a pattern of progress and success for their own lives, thus making their lives feel and appear inferior. The more you conquer, succeed, and prosper, the more competent and confident you will become.

A third reason for this feeling of inferiority among young black men is because many do not pursue more knowledge. I didn’t say education. Unfortunately, knowledge and education are not necessarily the same in our society. Be that as it may, the more knowledge that you have, the more confidence you will have. It is trite, but true – KNOWLEDGE IS POWER — and, may I say, huge power. Knowledge puts a smile on your face and a pep in your step that is unmistakable. Now when I speak of knowledge and confidence, I don’t speak of this haughty, snobbish and proud attitude that can come with knowledge. For Saint Paul said it well in 1 Corinthians 8:1: “Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.” No, I am speaking of the humble gaining of bold, loving, and biblical confidence.

No matter where we come from, what side of the tracks we live on, how rich or poor, we as young black men can and must have the confidence and boldness to accomplish great things that God designed for us to do.

Out of all of the billions of folks who have been born into this world, there is no one like you; and there is no one who can do what you can do.

No one is better than you. You are just as good as anyone else,

Daniel

Power Thoughts

P.T.: Arthur Ashe said, “I did not equate my self-worth with my wins and losses.”

Mark Mathabane said, “The most important thing I have to fight as a black person in an oppressive, racist society is what I think about myself.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, “With a spirit straining toward true self-esteem, the Negro must boldly throw off the manacles of self-abnegation and say to himself and the world: ‘I am somebody. I am a person. I am a man with dignity and honor. I have a rich and noble history.’”

John Singleton said, “If you respect yourself, it’s easier to respect other people.”

Max Robinson said, “I think one of my basic flaws has been a lack of self-esteem…always feeling like I had to do more. I never could do enough or be good enough.”