Wisdom, Part 4 (The Man in the Mirror #50)


Daniel Whyte III

Daniel Whyte III

This podcast is directed to all young people, but primarily to young black men, young black women, and their parents. We are thankful for all the people who are standing up for justice and racial equality. But this podcast is about the man in the mirror. What are you doing for the glory of God, to make life better for others, for your family, and for yourself? This podcast is about living life in such a way that it cuts back on the chance of being harassed or killed by the authorities or anyone else and helps you to live the good life of peace and joy.

Psalm 119:9 says, “Wherewithal shall a young man cleanse his way? by taking heed thereto according to thy word.”

Jim Rohn said, “You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself.”

Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?'”

In keeping with our theme of dealing with the man (or woman) in the mirror, we are going to continue discussing the building of important biblical character traits in your life. Today, we will continue looking at the quality of Wisdom from “The Power for True Success” by the Institute in Basic Life Principles.

How Do We Get Wisdom?

1. By asking God for it. James 1:5 says, “If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.”

2. By studying God’s Law. Deuteronomy 4:6 says, “Keep therefore and do them; for this is your wisdom and your understanding in the sight of the nations, which shall hear all these statutes, and say, Surely this great nation is a wise and understanding people.”

3. By keeping God’s commandments with us. Psalm 119:98 says, “Thou through thy commandments hast made me wiser than mine enemies: for they are ever with me.”

4. Through the fear of the Lord. Proverbs 9:10 says, “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding.”

5. By reading the Book of Proverbs. Proverbs 1:1-3 says, “The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel; To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding; To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity.”

6. By God’s testimonies. Psalm 19:7 says, “The law of the LORD is perfect, converting the soul: the testimony of the LORD is sure, making wise the simple.”

7. By hearing instruction. Proverbs 8:33 says, “Hear instruction, and be wise, and refuse it not.” Proverbs 9:9 says, “Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning.”

8. By seeking it early. Proverbs 8:17 says, “I love them that love me; and those that seek me early shall find me.”

9. By listening to rebuke. Proverbs 9:9 says, “Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning.”

10. By seeking wise counsel. Proverbs 13:20 says, “He that walketh with wise men shall be wise.”

Young person, no matter who you are or where you come from, you can get wisdom from God and live a life of purpose, success, and blessing.

– – – – – –

Now, in closing, in order to be saved — in order to get right with God — you cannot look at the man in the mirror, but the Man Christ Jesus. First Timothy 2:5 says, “For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus.”

If you do not know the Lord Jesus Christ as your Savior, here is how.

John 3:16 states, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that -whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” Just believe in your heart that Jesus Christ died for your sins, was buried, and rose from the dead by the power of God for you so that you can have a home in Heaven. Pray and ask Him to come into your heart today, and He will. Romans 10:13 says, “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

God bless you.


Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in over twenty-five foreign countries. He is the author of over forty books including the Essence Magazine, Dallas Morning News, and Amazon.com national bestseller, Letters to Young Black Men. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry.

He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts/podcasts, which include: The Prayer Motivator Devotional, The Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report, the Second Coming Watch Update and the Soul-Winning Motivator, among others.

He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, a Master’s degree in Religion, a Master of Divinity degree, and a Master of Theology degree from Liberty University’s Rawlings School of Divinity (formerly Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary). He is currently a candidate for the Doctor of Ministry degree.

He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica since 1987. God has blessed their union with seven children.

Wisdom, Part 3 (The Man in the Mirror #49)

Why Is Wisdom So Important?

In order to explain the superior value of wisdom, God compares it to the most precious things in life.

1. It is more valuable than gold. Proverbs 8:19 says, “My fruit is better than gold, yea, than fine gold; and my revenue than choice silver.”

2. It is more precious than jewels. Proverbs 8:11 says, “For wisdom is better than rubies; and all the things that may be desired are not to be compared to it.”

3. It is more valuable than riches. Proverbs 8:18 says, “Riches and honour are with me [wisdom]; yea, durable riches and righteousness.”

4. It should be our first priority. Proverbs 4:7 says, “Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.”

Wisdom, Part 1 (The Man in the Mirror #47)

In keeping with our theme of dealing with the man (or woman) in the mirror, we are going to continue discussing the building of important biblical character traits in your life. Today, we will begin looking at the quality of Wisdom from “The Power for True Success” by the Institute in Basic Life Principles.

Wisdom is seeing the hand of God in every experience of life.

The primary Hebrew word for wisdom is “chokmah.” It comes from a root word meaning “intelligent, prudent, cunning, clever; to teach, instruct.” Another Hebrew word translated
wisdom is “sekel.” It comes from a root word meaning “to be circumspect; to act prudently, to prosper, to have success; to have expertise; to teach; to give insight, have comprehension.” The stated purpose of Proverbs is to “know wisdom [chokmah]” and “to receive the instruction of wisdom [sakel].”

The main Greek word for wisdom is sophia, which denotes practical skill and acumen. One Greek word translated wise is “phro-ni-mos, which means “thoughtful, sagacious, discreet. It implies a cautious person.”

God provides a description of wisdom [sophia] in James 3:17: “The wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.”

Respect for God (The Man in the Mirror #11)

Today, I want to talk to you about the matter of Respect — particularly respect for God.

Aretha Franklin once sang a popular song titled “Respect.” The late comedian Rodney Dangerfield was famous for saying, “I can’t get no respect.” Perhaps you have been told to have self-respect. I am sure there are people you have respect for and people whom you would like to have respect from. However, the only way you will have a proper understanding of respect is if you have a healthy respect for God. That is what we will discuss today and in our next few broadcasts.

The Bible uses the term “fear” to describe respect for God. Ecclesiastes 12:13 says, “Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man.” This fear does not mean being afraid of God. Rather, it means having a healthy respect and reverence for God because of His holiness.

Fear of God, or respect for God, is closely tied to obedience. If we have the proper respect for God, we will obey Him in our everyday lives. Proverbs 8:13 says, “The fear of the LORD is to hate evil: pride, and arrogancy, and the evil way, and the froward mouth, do I hate.” Just as God hates sin, respect for God will lead you to hate sin and the consequences that come from sinning. And that respect will keep you out of a whole lot of trouble along the road of life.

Fear of God, or respect for God, is also tied to the gaining of wisdom and knowledge. People have a tendency to become proud from the knowledge or education that they gain. Even though each of us will only learn about a tiny fraction of all that there is to learn about the universe, we will be tempted to become puffed up with the little knowledge that we have. Having knowledge without a proper respect for God (who knows all things) is foolish. Proverbs 1:7 says, “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.” Realize that no matter how much you study, you will never come close to knowing all that there is to know. However, since God is omniscient (all-knowing), He demands and deserves our respect.

Finally, today, notice that fear of God, or respect for God, is the foundation of self-respect and respect for others. Why? Because you and every other person in the world is made in the image of God. You and every other person in the world carries God-given potential, dreams, and destiny. Never look down on yourself or on anyone else. Never belittle your gifts and talents or the gifts and talents of others.

When you have respect for God, you can have the proper respect for yourself and others.

We will take more on this matter of respect in our next episode.

“Mo’ Letters to Young Black Men”: Connections (Letter 1)

Pray! Think! Do!

Sir, I am assuming that you are attracted to women, and not to men.

You want to live your life in such a way that God can take you home at any time.

‘Longevity has its place,’ but doing the job that God designed you to do is the ultimate joy.

CONNECTIONS
Letter One

Dear Y.B.M.:

It has been a while since I have written to you. I trust that you are growing spiritually, mentally, and otherwise in your life as a young black man.

Again, I want to thank you for the many kind letters and e-mails that I received from you in response to the book, Letters to Young Black Men: Advice and Encouragement for a Difficult Journey. It was good to hear from you.

As for me, my family and I are doing well. We have had a few challenges since I last wrote to you, but we are doing fine, thank the Lord. Continue reading

“Mo’ Letters to Young Black Men”: Preface (The Brother’s Keeper)

I thank God for the great success of Letters to Young Black Men as it has now become a perennial national bestseller, an ESSENCE magazine national bestseller, a Dallas Morning News bestseller, and an Amazon.com bestseller for ten years straight.

mltybm-ltybmAllow me to share with you the two main reasons why I wrote Letters to Young Black Men.

The first reason is because the Lord impressed upon my heart the apparent great need among young black men in our community for Godly, loving, fatherly, advice and encouragement while on their journey in this life. I had a burden on my heart for my “kinsmen according to the flesh.”

It disturbed me to see so many young black men messing up their lives so early in life, simply because they were not firmly guided in the right direction. So by the leading of the Lord, I decided to put pen to paper in hopes that God would use Letters to Young Black Men to at least “save some.”

I believe that the written word is still one of the most effective ways to reach people in a more concrete and permanent way. God could have written His Word in the sky, but He chose to record all His Words in a Book—the Bible. Note what author, Bud Gardner, said: “When you speak, your words echo only across the room or down the hall. But when you write, your words echo down the ages.”

The second reason I wrote Letters to Young Black Men is because I am a child of the early sixties — arguably one of the most exciting periods of our American history. Indeed, in the words of Charles Dickens: “It was the best of times; it was the worst of times.” For black people, there could be no truer statement. Many agree that while we as a people were making major “strides toward freedom”, freeing ourselves from the awful Jim Crow era, and beginning to take our rightful place in American society, we began to lose some other important things, such as the good old fashioned way of raising our children, which included corporal chastisement for doing wrong, and an emphasis on virtue and doing the right thing. In addition to that, when so many doors to employment opportunities began to open for our parents and grandparents, many naturally took on the mentality: “My children won’t go through what I went through. They will have many of the things I did not have while I was growing up.”

No one can blame them for having that mentality. Coming out of what they came out of, anybody would have done the same. However, the results are still none-the-less damaging, and because of that natural mentality, we have a generation of young people, who, for the most part, lack character, are materialistic, do not carry the values of their forefathers, and do not respect their parents, or anyone else for that matter. Our community has suffered many casualties and losses, and has planted seeds of destruction and pain that are immeasurable, and that will probably take a generation to overcome.

These are the things that motivated me to write Letters to Young Black Men and now, Mo’ Letters to Young Black Men. However, I did not write these books as an end in themselves.

I wrote these books for all young black men, but I wrote them primarily for the young black men who have faced some disadvantages in their young life, for I am convinced that the young life is the most important part of life. I wrote this book for the young black man who has no father, or who has a weak father; for the young black man who has no mother, or who has a mother whose priorities are out of order. I believe that if things are not done right in a person’s childhood, it does not mean that he or she cannot cope with life when he or she gets older. However, there will be gaps in that person’s life, and those gaps will appear under pressure. These books are an attempt to help fill in some of those gaps in the lives of these young men.

I wrote these books to serve as a ramp that can get young black men on the right freeway—the freeway toward greater success and productivity in this life.

Your friend,

—Daniel Whyte III
Fort Worth, TX

Talk and Listen to Every Older Man Past Fifty That You Possibly Can (Letter 18)

Dear Y.B.M.:

I realize that you may feel more comfortable with those who are of the same age as you. However, may I suggest to you that it is very important that you spend some quality time talking to and listening to every older black man past fifty that you possibly can? These men will not claim perfection, nor will they claim to have it all together. Many of them will not have the educational background that you may have. But it behooves you to be quiet and listen to them.

mentoringDear friend, because of the light that you have received in this age of knowledge and information, you may know a little about the super highways of life; but you don’t know much, if anything, about the smaller back-roads and shortcuts of life. Also, even though you may know a little about the main highways of life, you do not know what lies ahead on those highways. These older gentlemen do, because they have passed this way before. There is a lot that you think you know that you don’t know. As you grow older you will become increasingly aware of how ignorant you really are. These dear older brothers, who have passed this way before, have been down both the super highways and the small back-roads and shortcuts. And they can really help you make a grand success of this life, if you would only listen to them.

The Bible says in Proverbs 1:7, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge: but fools despise wisdom and instruction.”

Proverbs 11:14 says, “Where no counsel is, the people fall: but in the multitude of counselors there is safety.”

Here are some of the wonderful and positive things that older men can impart to you if you are ready to hear a “word to the wise.”

1. They can help you avoid the pitfalls along the road of life.

2. They can outline for you the priorities in life that you need to concentrate on.

3. They can advise you as to which road is best for you to take at various junctions on the road of life.

4. The real good, older men will admit their mistakes and failures, and will genuinely try to help you to avoid them.

Listen, learn and live, dear brother.

Now most of these wise older brothers will let it be known that they do not have time to waste. Nor do they like to offer their valuable advice and time to just anybody — particularly one who is a fool. (i.e., one who will not listen to and heed sound advice.) So, these wise, old men are not called wise, old men for nothing. They can see right through you. They know if you are sincere or not. They will be slow and cautious in dealing with you until they are convinced you are for real. Now here are some ways to convince them that you are sincere:

1. Do not act in any way as though you already know the answer to all of the various issues of life. (Even if you do know, don’t act as though you do.) The fact of the matter is, YOU DO NOT KNOW ALL THAT YOU THINK YOU KNOW! So, don’t be a “know it all.” Shut up! while the man is talking, and please do not say stupid things like “I already know that.” Listen. Really listen. If these men detect that you are not really listening to them, they will not tell you anything.

2. Ask intelligent questions, and wait for the answer. If he does not give you the answer, then ask again. Re-phrase the question. Do what you have to do to get the answer. Bug them, bother them, annoy them. It is that important. Sometimes you have to dig for gold, son.

3. Don’t waste their time. Be very concerned about their time. They will appreciate it. Their time is more important than yours, not only because of their age, but because their time is shorter. Usually men, fifty and above, don’t play around anymore when it comes to their time. They are very serious about their time, and you had better be too, or they will abruptly cut you off. Think your questions through. Write your questions down. Do not go in half-cocked.

4. Train yourself to spend more time around older, wise men, than young, foolish men. (There are some young, wise men too, by the way, but not many.) Young, foolish men can’t teach you anything; older, wise men can teach you a lot. If you want to become a better, wiser man, hang with the heavies.

Most of my close friends are at least ten years my senior. Their age, wisdom, advice and encouragement has been of great benefit and blessing to me. Through their wise counsel, I have avoided many pitfalls and have received some bread to pass on to my younger brothers. I hope that you will take my advice and start listening to the older, wiser brothers.

Hanging With The Heavies,

Daniel

Power Thoughts

P.T.: Denzel Washington says, “A person completely wrapped up in himself makes a small package.”

Frederick Douglass says, “Truth is proper and beautiful in all times and in all places.”
Arnold H. Glasgow says, “A true friend never gets in your way unless you happen to be going down.”

Les Brown says, “Align yourself with powerful people. Align yourself with people that you can learn from, people who want more out of life, people who are stretching and searching and seeking some higher ground in life.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson says, “A friend may well be reckoned the masterpiece of nature.”